Writing success

February 23, 2016 | 1 min read

Welcome to the Astrohaus blog!

We're here to talk about writing success.

A quick confession: we have no idea what that means. How can you know when your words, your book, your career is successful? Is it the number of Twitter followers you collect? A collection of positive reviews that show up when your name is Googled? Or is there even such a thing as a universal indicator of writing success? How do you achieve it?

In this space, we're exploring the struggles and victories that come with being a wordsmith. We're sharing tips, thoughts, and tools here on this blog, and we've tapped some of our favorite writers to lend us their wisdom, too.

If you're interested in contributing or have a suggestion for the types of posts you'd like to see on the blog, send us a note at hello@astrohaus.com

Happy writing,
Steph

Community Director, Astrohaus

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